Mining in Nigeria || Geo-Total on Mining

Mining in Nigeria, mining news, mining industry, gold, mineral exploration metal, iron, irons, steel
Mining in Nigeria, mining news, mining industry, gold, mineral exploration metal, iron, irons, steel

Geo-Total with the expertise and resources. The mining of minerals in Nigeria accounts for only 0.3% of its GDP, due to the influence of its vast oil resources. The domestic mining industry is underdeveloped, leading to Nigeria having to import minerals that it could produce domestically, such as salt or iron ore. Rights to ownership of mineral resources are held by the Federal government of Nigeria, which grants titles to organizations to explore, mine, and sell mineral resources. Organized mining began in 1903 when the Mineral Survey of the Northern Protectorates was created by the British colonial government. A year later, the Mineral Survey of the Southern Protectorates was founded. By the 1940s, Nigeria was a major producer of tincolumbite, and coal. The discovery of oil in 1956 hurt the mineral extraction industries, as government and industry both began to focus on this new resource. The Nigerian Civil War in the late 1960s led many expatriate mining experts to leave the country.[1] Mining regulation is handled by the Ministry of Solid Minerals Development, which oversees the management of all mineral resources. Mining law is codified in the Federal Minerals and Mining Act of 1999. Historically, Nigeria’s mining industry was monopolized by state-owned public corporations. This led to a decline in productivity in almost all mineral industries. The Obasanjo administration began a process of selling off government-owned corporations to private investors in 1999. 9 Source ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_industry_of_Nigeria)

Coal, lignite and coke

Mining is the extraction[removal]of minerals and metals from the earth. The Nigerian Coal Corporation (NCC) is a parastatal corporation that was formed in 1950 and held a monopoly on the mining, processing, and sales of coal, lignite, and coke products until 1999.[2]

Coal was first discovered in Enugu in 1909 at the Udi Ridge in Enugu, This was found by a British mine Engineer known as Albert Kitson. Coal geology is a mixture of sedimentary rock and ancient vegetation which have been changed due to heat and microbial activities over a considerable period of time. The Ogbete Mine had opened and begun regularly extracting coal by 1916. By 1920, coal production had reached 180,122 long tons (183,012 t). Nigeria coal was established in 1950, and by 1960 production was at 565,681 long tons (574,758 t). The Nigerian Civil War caused many mines to be abandoned. After the war ended in the early 1970s, coal production was never able to recover. Attempts to mechanize the industry in the 1970s and 1980s were ultimately unsuccessful and actually hindered production due to problems with implementation and maintenance.[2] The main purpose of the use of coal in Nigeria is for the operation of the railway system. Coal was converted to diesel after Nigeria civil war and the coal mining industry was abandoned.

The Nigerian government is currently trying to privatize the Nigerian Coal Corporation and sell off its assets. While the domestic market for coal has been negatively affected by the move to diesel and gas-powered engines by organizations that were previously major coal consumers, the low-sulfur coal mined in Nigeria is desirable by international customers in Italy and the United Kingdom, who have imported Nigerian coal. Recent financial problems have caused a near shutdown of the NCC’s coal mining operations, and the corporation has responded by attempting to sell off some of its assets while it waits for the government to complete privatization activities.[3][4]

In April 2008, Minister of Mines and Steel Sarafa Tunji Ishola announced that Nigeria was considering coal as an alternative power source as it attempts to reform its power sector, and encouraged Chinese investors to invest in the coal industry.[5]

The Nigerian Mining Cadastre Office manages all the Nigerian mining licenses and mining rights. They are a subsidiary of the Ministry of Mines and Steel Development of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

Iron ore

Nigeria has several deposits of iron ore, but the purest deposits are in and around Itakpe in Kogi State.[6][7]

The National Iron Ore Mining Company was founded in 1979 and given the mission to explore, exploit, process, and supply iron ore concentrate to the Ajaokuta Steel Company (ASCL) in Ajaokuta and Delta Steel Company (DCL) in Aladja. Additional demand has come from several steel rolling mills. The company and its mining operations are based in Kogi State. Export of excess iron ore beyond what is required for domestic needs is currently being explored. Additionally, the Nigerian government has invested in foreign iron ore operations in Guinea.[7] 3